Wednesday, April 14African Business News
Shadow

Maritime

‘Cabotage law review passes first reading’

‘Cabotage law review passes first reading’

Maritime
The House of Representatives Committee on Maritime Safety, Education and Administration has disclosed that the Coastal and Inland Shipping Act Amendment Bill has gone through first reading. Chairman of the committee, Lynda Ikpeazu, who made this known during an oversight visit to NIMASA, said the proposed amendment would reflect contemporary issues that would be beneficial to indigenous ship owners. She said: “A more responsive Cabotage law will stimulate opportunities and policies for giving seafarers jobs and improve on shipbuilding capacity.” Ikpeazu expressed confidence in the current management of NIMASA led by the Director-General, Dr. Bashir Jamoh. He said: “The Director-General has laid a good foundation for the committee and we are here to monitor the activit...
F.G considers tax holiday for maritime to cushion COVID-19 effect

F.G considers tax holiday for maritime to cushion COVID-19 effect

Maritime
Poised to stimulate investment and boost activities amid the downturn induced by COVID-19, the Federal Ministry of Transportation is seeking a package of tax incentives for the in the maritime sector. The Director-General, Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA), Bashir Jamoh, told the Minister of Finance, Zainab Ahmed, in Abuja, that the move will further support the growth of the sector. He said many governments around the globe have introduced massive tax reduction or elimination to spur activities in key sectors, and rev up their economies during the coronavirus pandemic. “The maritime sector is critical in the growth and development of transportation and, by extension, international trade in the country. Thus, the need for Federal Government-oriented p...
300,000 seafarers still stuck on ship

300,000 seafarers still stuck on ship

Maritime
About 300,000 seafarers are still stuck aboard vessels across the world owing to the coronavirus pandemic. Some of the affected seafarers said they are already feeling like they have been taken “hostage”, while they miss their families for several months. One of the seafarers, Ashchaye Mohitram, said he has not set foot on land since early March. He’s been stuck on an MSC cruise ship since the COVID-19 pandemic, which forced the cruise industry to shut down most global operations. “For the past six months we have been struggling to get back home,” Mohitram told ABC News. “We feel like hostages here, being far away from our family and not being on land for so long.” The 28-year-old steward said he’s one of a group of 103 Mauritian seafarers on three different MSC ships near the...